DA's 2017 Offseason Rankings: The Bottom 10

This is source I found from another site, main source you can find in last paragraph

Otto Greule Jr/Getty Images

108. Tanner McEvoy, Seattle Seahawks

Route Running: 10/30

Hands: 9/25

YAC: 9/20

Blocking: 7/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 43/100

McEvoy is a big-bodied receiver at 6'6", 230 pounds and found a role as a No. 4 wideout this year. The Seahawks used him as a big-play receiver who rotated between the outside and the slot. The two-year vet is a former college quarterback and is still learning the fine details of playing the position, but he might still be too raw to be on the field as much as he was in 2017.

Despite his size, which is his best attribute, he's not a good blocker and struggles to create separation. He also doesn't consistently finish through contact. McEvoy has a long way to before he can be considered average.

                

107. Kendrick Bourne, San Francisco 49ers

Route Running: 8/30

Hands: 10/25

YAC: 9/20

Blocking: 9/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 44/100

Bourne is a below-average athlete who wins by trying to outmuscle smaller defensive backs. The 6'1", 205-pounder was the 49ers' No. 5 receiver this season when everyone was healthy. He's a bottom-of-the-roster type who will only stick in the NFL by playing special teams. He is an adequate blocker but doesn't have many redeeming receiving traits.

              

106. Joshua Bellamy, Chicago Bears

Route Running: 8/30

Hands: 7/25

YAC: 9/20

Blocking: 12/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 44/100

For the past few seasons, injuries have allowed Bellamy to get end-of-year snaps. 2017 was no different, as most of his production came in the final four weeks. He's an above-average blocker with decent size (6'0", 208 lbs) who struggles at nearly every part of the receiving game. The 28-year-old has some of the most inconsistent hands in the NFL and is a poor route-runner. He is only on the roster due to his special teams ability and the Bears' lack of depth.

105. Tanner Gentry, Chicago Bears

Route Running: 7/30

Hands: 11/25

YAC: 9/20

Blocking: 10/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 45/100

Gentry started three games for the Bears before he was waived midway through his rookie season. When he was on the field, he was a surprisingly good blocker, but he struggled in all aspects of the receiving game. The 6'1", 210-pounder possessed decent size and good movement skills, but was he so raw as a route-runner that it eventually forced him off the roster. Gentry has talent, but he needs to develop on a team's practice squad for the next few years before he is ready to see the field on Sundays.

                

104. Amara Darboh, Seattle Seahawks

Route Running: 12/30

Hands: 8/25

YAC: 8/20

Blocking: 10/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 46/100

Darboh was buried on the Seahawks' depth chart as a rookie and only caught eight passes in 2017. But when he was on the field, he showed he's still raw. He needs to work on his hand technique this offseason as he relies too much on his body to catch simple passes. At 6'2", 219 pounds, Darboh has size and is a decent route-runner for a third-rounder, but he is still a few years away from being a reliable contributor.

103. Chester Rogers, Indianapolis Colts

Route Running: 11/30

Hands: 10/25

YAC: 10/20

Blocking: 8/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 47/100

Rogers was the fourth receiver on a team without good weapons at the position. He returned punts and showed some ability to gain yards after the catch. He second-year man made a couple of nice grabs but dropped a bunch of balls also. He needs to work on getting off press coverage to evolve as a route-runner.

                

102. Johnny Holton, Oakland Raiders

Route Running: 10/30

Hands: 10/25

YAC: 10/20

Blocking: 9/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 47/100

Mostly a special teamer, Holton gets the occasional opportunity to run a route. He's 6'1" and made a nice pluck and toe-tap catch against the New York Giants, but he also dropped a handful of easy targets. Holton can be used as a deep threat who'll make a random nice grab.

                  

101. Michael Floyd, Minnesota Vikings

Route Running: 11/30

Hands: 9/25

YAC: 10/20

Blocking: 9/15

Position Value: 8/10

Overall Grade: 47/100

Floyd exhibited some skills in Bruce Arians' vertical passing offense with the Cardinals a few years back, putting up a 1,000-yard season in 2013. But his effect has diminished greatly since then—with the Cardinals, with the Patriots in 2016 (when he was a healthy scratch for Super Bowl LI), and with the Vikings in 2017. Floyd underwent a four-game suspension to start the season for violating the league's substance-abuse policy, and he struggled to make an impact even when Stefon Diggs was injured. Sadly, he's one of the league's most obvious examples of raw talent surrounded by a lack of field intelligence and advancement of technique.

This is source I found from another site, main source you can find in last paragraph

Source : http://bleacherreport.com/articles/2752678-nfl1000-ranking-the-top-outside-wide-receivers-of-2017-season

performing

performing

NFL1000: Ranking the Top Outside Wide Receivers of 2017 Season
DA's Offseason Rankings: The Bottom 10 teams
2018 offseason outlook: Ranking each position for the Bears based off of need
Ranking the 49ers’ 2018 offseason priorities
The 2018 League of Legends preseason power rankings
Lowdown: San Fran Shuffle
Giants Add McCutchen As Pirates Sell-Off Continues
NFL 2017 Predictions: Ranking The Top 10 Quarterbacks For The Upcoming Season
NFL’s biggest underperformers: Lions RBs rank No. 4
The Sound-Smarter-Than-Your-Friends Guide to the Buccaneers’ Offseason: Top Priorities