The Lion City's Glorious Past

This is source I found from another site, main source you can find in last paragraph

It was some time after 4pm on Saturday and the Gabba was in tumult. Alastair Cook and Mark Stoneman walked the long, slow walk to the middle and the denizens of the top tier, the most raucous section of this bear-pit of a stadium, slammed their plastic seat bottoms against their metal supports and added their yells, screams, jeers and whistles to a cacophony of chaos.

It was bedlam. The sun beat down and Aussie fans swathed in green and gold and painted with sunscreen that looked like warpaint, came and went in the stands, carrying trays of four glasses of beer, responding to incessant chants of 'skull, skull, skull, skull' by downing them in one and then placing them upside down on the tops of their heads.

Cook did not look up as he walked to the wicket for the start of England's second innings but he could hear the fervour in the crowd and sense their lust for victims. He knew for sure he was about to face cricket's version of being thrown to the lions.

England opening batsman Alastair Cook can only look back in anger as Josh Hazlewood celebrates dismissing him for seven

England opening batsman Alastair Cook can only look back in anger as Josh Hazlewood celebrates dismissing him for seven

Cook was out attempting to hook Hazlewood and was caught by a diving Mitchell Starc at long leg

Cook was out attempting to hook Hazlewood and was caught by a diving Mitchell Starc at long leg

Hazlewood is mobbed by his Australia team-mates after getting the prize wicket of Cook as England struggled in Brisbane

Hazlewood is mobbed by his Australia team-mates after getting the prize wicket of Cook as England struggled in Brisbane

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He knew what was required of him, too. For most of the day, the former England captain had laboured in the field with the rest of Joe Root's team as 33,000 spectators watched an unbeaten performance of quite stunning determination and discipline from Australia skipper Steve Smith that had carried his team beyond England's first innings total.

England set traps for Smith. Ball after ball and over after over, they dug the ball in short at him, inviting him to hook, crowding the legside with a leg gully, a square leg, a mid-on, a deep backward square leg and a deep midwicket. Another former England captain, Mark Nicholas, observed that it was like watching a modern version of bodyline.

But Smith refused to take the bait. He watched the barrage of short balls fly past his head. He ducked under them. He did not take them on. England's research had shown them that Smith is rarely clean bowled or out lbw and so they tried to tempt him into a loose shot outside off stump to find an edge. Once more, he declined the invitation.

He was patience personified. He spent 56 minutes in the 90s before a glorious cover drive brought him his 21st Test century. It had taken him 261 balls. He went on to make an unbeaten 141. From the Gabba press room, Michael Atherton, who had famously scored a similarly indomitable century in Johannesburg in 1995, watched on in admiration. 

Cook knew he had to try to produce something similar. Smith had shown an iron will. Now it was Cook's turn. England needed him to display all the stoicism and skill that has made him one of the country's greatest batsmen. He might not be captain any more but how they needed his experience to lead them by example. Not so long ago, you would not have picked any other man for the job.

He had, after all, faced a similar situation at this stadium seven years ago when England went into their second innings of the first Test trailing the Australians by 221 runs. Cook responded by scoring 235 not out, the highest Test score recorded at the Gabba, in a remarkable total of 517 for one. England saved the game and laid the foundations for their series victory.

Cook looks on nervously after playing a shot during his brief innings of seven runs from 13 balls in 16 minutes at the Gabba

Cook looks on nervously after playing a shot during his brief innings of seven runs from 13 balls in 16 minutes at the Gabba

Hazlewood successfully managed to lure Cook into a hook shot, the ball hitting the top edge of his bat and looping to Starc

Hazlewood successfully managed to lure Cook into a hook shot, the ball hitting the top edge of his bat and looping to Starc

Contrasting emotions as Cook makes the lonely walk back to the dressing room as Australia's player celebrate jubilantly

Contrasting emotions as Cook makes the lonely walk back to the dressing room as Australia's player celebrate jubilantly

Cook's dismissal delighted the majority of the raucous 33,000 strong crowd at the Gabba on the third day of the first Test

Cook's dismissal delighted the majority of the raucous 33,000 strong crowd at the Gabba on the third day of the first Test

Cook had fallen cheaply in England's first innings on Thursday, caught in the slips off the bowling of Mitchell Starc for two. He was in scratchy form in the warm-up games on this tour and on the eve of this Test, he admitted that he would have liked to have spent more time in the middle in the build-up.

The din was deafening as Starc ran in at him this time. His first delivery hurtled down the legside and Cook flicked at it, surviving a loud appeal for caught behind. The crowd sensed the aggression in Starc straight away. They could see how fired up he was. They screamed like banshees. Cook survived the over.

Starc and Hazelwood bowled like dervishes. It felt as if a force of nature had been unleashed and the passion poured down from the stands. Cook moved on to seven but when Hazelwood dug the third ball of the fourth over in short, Cook fell straight into the trap.

He did exactly what Smith had refused to do. He took it on. He swivelled and hooked it but it caught the bat's top edge and looped high down to long leg where Starc ran around to take a fine, diving catch. Cook had only faced 13 balls. An Aussie fan standing near one of the exits with his beers exulted. 'There's blood in the water,' he hollered.

Australia captain Steve Smith negotiated a barrage of bouncers from England's bowlers en route to his innings of 141 not out

Australia captain Steve Smith negotiated a barrage of bouncers from England's bowlers en route to his innings of 141 not out

It was a majestic performance by the Australian captain, who successfully negotiated all the traps England tried to set for him

It was a majestic performance by the Australian captain, who successfully negotiated all the traps England tried to set for him

A pumped-up Smith celebrated his century by clutching the Australia badge on his shirt and kissing his helmet

A pumped-up Smith celebrated his century by clutching the Australia badge on his shirt and kissing his helmet

The Australians celebrated wildly but a sense of disbelief spread around the England supporters in the ground. It was so un-Cook. It was so uncharacteristic. A man is who is usually the epitome of patience had lost his head. A team player to the tips of his toes, he had just thrown his wicket away at a crucial moment in the match. Only people who whistle in the dressing room are supposed to do that.

It was exactly what Australia needed. After Root, Cook is still the scalp they prize most of all. Their energy was redoubled. The crowd screamed even louder. Twelve balls later, James Vince was caught in the slips off Josh Hazlewood and England were 17 for two. Soon after that, Root was struck in the helmet by a vicious Starc bouncer.

Cook does not have much time to find his form. The second Test begins in Adelaide on Saturday and the England hierarchy knows that their chances of retaining the Ashes will fall dramatically if Cook cannot rebuild his confidence and get in the runs again. Root needs him, too. At the moment, there is way too much pressure on him to do it all himself.

Root may be England's leader and best batsman now but they still look to Cook, too. He is after all, England's record run scorer and the only Englishman to score more than 10,000 runs in Test cricket. He is only 32. It is not as if he is in his dotage.

There was a party atmosphere at the Gabba as thousands of cricket fans soaked up the sun and enjoyed an engrossing day

There was a party atmosphere at the Gabba as thousands of cricket fans soaked up the sun and enjoyed an engrossing day

The Brisbane stadium is undoubtedly one of the most partisan in Australia, with the home fans showing their colours

The Brisbane stadium is undoubtedly one of the most partisan in Australia, with the home fans showing their colours

Some fans took the opportunity to cool off in the Gabba's swimming pool deck while also watching the action unfold

Some fans took the opportunity to cool off in the Gabba's swimming pool deck while also watching the action unfold

Only eight players have scored more runs than him in the history of the world game and before England arrived in Australia, he would have been hoping to score enough runs to overtake Mahela Jayawardene, Shivnarine Chanderpaul and Brian Lara on this tour.

It may still happen. Cook is nothing if not dogged, which was why the manner of his dismissal on Saturday was such a jolt. He had been through bad trots before and come out the other side and it is way too early to start thinking he won't do it again.

Stuart Broad, who bowled beautifully during the Australian innings, was unconcerned by Cook's struggles here. 'He is so strong mentally,' Broad said after the close of play. 'All the stress of the captaincy has gone and he is loving his cricket. His time in Australia will come.'

England will be desperate for him to be right. It was Cook's misfortune that his dismissal provided such a sharp contrast to the discipline shown by Smith and he will be harder on himself than any critic. The irresponsibility of his hook shot yesterday feels like an aberration. In Adelaide and the Tests that follow, he will have to prove it.

This is source I found from another site, main source you can find in last paragraph

Source : http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sport/cricket/article-5116355/Alastair-Cook-fell-straight-Australias-trap.html?ITO=1490

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